Monday, June 18, 2012

Kenmore 1756~Update!

A few weeks ago, our friends J&D were out garage saling on a Friday afternoon, and saw this sewing machine. It was in a cabinet and marked $20.  J, bless her heart, told the seller about The Sewing Machine Project, and the seller said she would donate it if that is where the machine would be going. J&D loaded up the cabinet and machine and accessories. The seller then told her that it would sew for about five minutes, then there was ‘something wrong’. J told her, ‘Don’t worry, I think Michelle and Louie can fix it’.

Bernina kenmore 014

The SMP does not accept machines in cabinets, so D took the machine out of the cabinet, and delivered the machine to me. I have had it for a week or so, and Sunday, decided to work on it. I didn’t try plugging it in and running it before I worked on it, and I’m glad I didn’t. I had turned the hand wheel, and found it hard to turn, and I could hear a ‘rubbing’ sound. I started oiling and investigating things, and in the process, started to remove the hand wheel. It was attached a little bit different than others I have worked on, in that, the machine has two belts. One goes from the hand wheel to a pulley, and the other belt goes from the same pulley, only on a different ‘track’ to the motor. I had a difficult time removing the hand wheel, and I decided I better loosen and move the bracket on the motor so I could remove the belt. That required the end panel coming off, because the hand wheel kind of sat in a ‘groove’ of that panel. I had a difficult time getting the panel off, because it seemed something was ‘pushing’ against the inside panel. When I finally freed the belt from the motor, look what was just sitting around on the inside. It should have been attached to a bracket.

Bernina kenmore 013

I screwed the pulley back to the bracket and all seemed well. I finished oiling and freeing ‘stuck’ parts (do you see a theme here with these vintage machines?) and I ran the machine. It worked well for a few minutes, then I heard an awful sound, and guess what was lying inside the side cover again? Yep. The pulley was not turning, because it was ‘gummed up’, and the motor and belt unscrewed it from the bracket.

This called for ‘backup’. “Oh, Louieeeeeee!” He determined that the pulley wheel was not moving at all, so we got out Mr. Blow Dryer again, and applied some oil, and soon, it was freed. Louie took it apart farther, cleaned the shaft, greased it, put it back together, and screwed it back to the bracket, this time applying some ‘locktite’ to the screw. The pulley spun freely, the machine was oiled, and when that was all done, the mechanism that lowers the feed dogs had loosened and released, and I was on my way to doing some sample stitches.

Bernina kenmore 015

She’s ready for The SMP. One down, five more to go…until I get some more! They seem to be multiplying! Thank you kind lady from the garage sale. I wish I had your name so I could donate your machine in your name. I will put a note on it crediting you. UPDATE: I now have the kind lady’s name, thanks to my good friend J, so this machine can be properly donated in her name. M** S** B****, thank you SEW much for helping this cause. You are an angel! Angel

ps…I just wanted to say to those who faithfully read my blog posts and comment, thank you. I appreciate hearing from you. I bet you get tired of saying the same things over and over to me. I write these blog posts so I can keep track of the machines that I find, fix, and donate or keep, so I can look back and see what I did to them to make them work, in case I have to do it again, and just to remember the machines that went through my hands. I appreciate the comments, and I hope you don’t run away. Please don’t’ feel obligated to comment on each one (but you can if you want Rolling on the floor laughing ) I’m not posting for a pat on the back, I’m just keeping a record of my ‘finds’ and ‘fixes’.

Have a wonderful week!

Michelle

12 comments:

Happy Cottage Quilter said...

I think it is so interesting to read about your finds and how you and your Louie fix them. It is exciting to me to see these old gals up and running again like they did when they were new. It's like giving them a new heart. I see old sewing machines all the time at Goodwill, but I'm not close enough to you to bring them to you. Some do not have foot controls or cords. But I'm sure you could make them run ;-) I'm looking for that old Bernina you found the other day!!!!

Kristie said...

Michelle, that is a wonderful thing that you and Louie are doing.
Kristie

JustPam said...

As a vintage sewing machine hoarder, I enjoy reading about your machines. Keep up the good work.

Jeanna said...

Another machine! You guys are amazing! I love reading about what you do with machines!!

Packrat said...

It is wonderful what you are doing.

As to this machine, I almost cried when I saw it. It looks like the machine that my grandparents gave me when I graduated from high school (1972). I loved it! Sadly, it quit working. Had it worked on several times, but no one could fix it. I don't even know what happened to it (attic maybe).

Elizabeth said...

Michelle,
You make me smile......

Regina said...

I find it fascinating - and dangerously tempting to follow in your footsteps!!!!

That corgi :) said...

How cool that that lady at the garage sale donating the machine (I would have done the same thing and I bet a lot of others would too). I do like to read about your accomplishments with this, Michelle; it is sooooo cool!

betty

Connie said...

Michelle, if my machines ever break down I'm driving to your house! If you can't fix it we'll just yell for Louie! I love reading about all the sewing machines so keep on posting! Great job fixing it!

kath001 said...

I like the rescue posts too! And I have a question for you... I barely drag out my one vintage machine (the only one I have to use) to keep it's parts moving. How do you get around to keeping all of yours going? Do you sew a quick line of stitching on all of them on a regular basis? What would your recommendation be for keeping a little used machine in working shape and a schedule to do so.

Okay, that's more than one question, but I thought you would be just the person to ask!

kathleen

ytsmom said...

I'm impressed with your skills, and your husband's! Kenmores are usually work horses, so this should be a great machine for someone.

waggonswest said...

I enjoy your rescue posts. In this throw away society it is an inspiration to see that a little hot air and elbow grease can make a lost machine functional.

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